— Contact Us —

Contact Us with any questions about your Alaska Adventure Trip!

1-888-933-5427     (Toll Free)
1-907-231-6395

info@steliasguides.com

If you have any questions about our trips, our location, logistics, or even simply want advice regarding your Alaska trip overall, please don’t hesitate to contact us.

If you have detailed questions or are considering a multi-day trip with us, we find that phone conversations are the best way to get to know you and your situation and therefore provide you with the most useful information and advice possible. Feel free to call us directly or fill out the form below, being sure to leave your number and good times to reach you.

If you have a simple question or two, or prefer email communication over the phone, that is just fine as well! We will get back to you as soon as possible!

Frequently asked questions:

I only have one or two days to spend in the area. What should I do?

There is certainly enough here to keep most people engaged for at least 2-3 days, but 1 full day is enough to get a taste! You’ll probably want to come back! We recommend that you stay long enough to fit in a hike on the Root Glacier (or an ice climb!) and a history tour of Kennecott. You can do these both in one day or split them between two days. And if you have time, get up in a plane somehow – that could be on your raft and flightsee or on a separate flightseeing trip with Wrangell Mountain Air. Check out our activity combination ideas here!

Who will my guide be?

Because we are a long-established company with a great reputation in a stunning and remote location, we attract the best guides in the business! We hire competent men and women with extensive outdoor experience, first aid training, and great personalities and then put them through a thorough training program unique to our area and our programs. Because our schedule is as dynamic as the environment we live in, we usually assign guides the night before for our Day Trips. We love and trust every one of them and we know you will too! You can read more about these fabulous individuals here.

Should I tip my guide? How much?

Tipping is customary in the guiding industry and always appreciated. Our guides are paid professionals but tips make up a significant portion of their income and can go a long way toward making guiding a feasible long-term career choice. For our day trips, a good estimate is between 10% and 20% of the trip cost. So if you go on a day hike or climb with us, that would come to between $10 and $35 per person, depending on the trip and the percentage. As in any industry, your tip should be based on the service you feel you received. If you had the time of your life, the sky’s the limit! You can tip your guides in cash, via Venmo or you can leave a gratuity on your card. If your trip includes a flight you should plan on tipping your pilot independently, any amount that you pre-tip will go to your guide directly. Thank you for considering this ahead of time!

Do I need to bring a lunch on my day trip?

It depends on the trip!

Glacier Activities – Yes, you do need to bring your own lunch. Bringing lunch is highly recommended to help keep you fueled during your time out on the glacier, especially for the Full-Day Hike or Ice Climbing!

Fly-In Activities – Yes. You’ll be out in the Backcountry from morning until evening, so you’ll definitely want to bring a lunch 

Raft & Flightsee – No, lunch is provided! Please let us know at the time of your booking if you have any allergies or dietary restrictions.

Kayaking Activities – Yes, you do need to bring your own lunch.

You’re welcome to reserve a Snack Pack for $8 or purchase one at our office at the start of your hike. If you are staying at the Kennicott Glacier Lodge and have purchased a meal plan, they will provide you with a sack lunch for the day.

What should I bring for my trip?

Whether you are joining us for a Day Trip or a longer Multi-Day Adventure, we have created a specialized packing list for you to consult as you are preparing for your trip. Our equipment lists are thoughtfully curated and have been refined over the decades we’ve been running trips – each item has a purpose! You can find all our Equipment Lists here or on each trip’s individual page. Be aware that there is no gear store in McCarthy-Kennecott so please come as prepared as possible. Please let us know if you have more specific questions on what to bring!

What is the best time to visit?

The best time to visit McCarthy/Kennecott and the Wrangells is June-September. This is when most of the backcountry is accessible, the National Park Service operations are running and most businesses in town, including lodging accommodations and restaurants, are open.

We start our mountaineering trips in early May, but most of our other tours are available starting Memorial Day weekend!

At the end of May it is still very quiet in town and can be a great time to avoid the crowds, however, it is still a little chilly, the bugs are just starting to come out and no fly-in destinations are accessible for hiking and backpacking. The sun sets really, really late and only for a brief time.

June remains a little quieter as the season builds up but by mid-June the wildflowers start coming out and the weather warms up significantly. Most backcountry strips become accessible toward the end of the month. The mosquitoes start to get thick toward mid-month but are easy to avoid on the glacier or while moving around. The sun won’t set until the end of August, so enjoy the land of the midnight sun!

July is considered prime-time in the Wrangells, with the warmest and typically sunniest weather and wildflowers in full bloom! It also means that this is the most popular time of year to visit so you may see more people around town than usual, especially around the 4th of July, Independence Day, holiday. July is also our heaviest mosquito time but the bugs are quite easy to avoid and not that bad, altogether. All backcountry destinations are usually accessible all month.

August continues all the joys of July, however, the mosquitoes die down significantly! The weather tends to be a bit more fickle this month, but it’s still a very pop[ular time of year to visit. Toward the very end of the month, you can catch the leaves and tundra changing colors, getting ready for fall and sun finally starting to set.

In September, the fall colors are out and they are incredible! The mosquitoes are gone too! This month can be a little cooler so you’ll want to pack some warmer layers, and most backcountry strips are still available to fly in and out of. It’s much quieter around town as the season winds down, and if you’re lucky you may catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights!

All that said, remember that Alaska’s mountain weather changes frequently and can surprise even an experienced outdoorsman! It’s been known to snow in July, not rain at all, or rain almost every day of the summer, so be prepared for just about anything!

It is also possible to visit the park in the “winter months” however please be advised that access is difficult and little support is available. We do not provide tours, shuttles, trip planning or any other kind of support or services for personal trips to the Park during the winter.

How do I get around town once I arrive?

Regardless of how you arrive in McCarthy, be advised that no outside vehicles are permitted within the town, so don’t plan on being able to drive yourself around. Uber and taxi services are a laughable concept out here in the bush…you’ll see!

Within the towns of Kennecott and McCarthy, all local businesses and points of attraction are within walking distance.

To get between Kennecott and McCarthy most people ride the local Copper Town Shuttle (pricing and schedule change seasonally), however, you can also walk or bike the 4.5mi between the two towns.

The Footbridge at the end of the McCarthy Road is about a 20min walk from McCarthy. The Copper Town Shuttle also offers service to the Footbridge on a regular schedule.

Most local lodging hosts will provide transportation for check-in and check-out so you should be able to get to your accommodations from either the Footbridge if you’re driving in or from the airstrip if you’re flying in – check with your host for more details.

If you’re doing an activity with us, chances are we provide transportation! Check with us if you are unsure if transportation is provided for your activity.

What is the condition of the McCarthy Road?

The condition of the road varies during the course of the Summer Season (May-September), and travel is not advised during the Winter Months (November-April). If you do choose to drive down the McCarthy Road in the Summer you should keep the following in mind:

  • It is a 60-mile gravel road.
  • There are many potholes and frost heaves along the way.
  • There are narrow sections of road and soft shoulders.
  • Sharp rocks and old railroad spikes can cause flat tires, you should always travel with a spare.
  • Landslides have been known to occur on certain sections of the road, blocking progress.
  • Travel is slow going, and you shouldn’t go any more than ~35 miles per hour.
  • Always allot more time to travel the road than you think you need, we recommend 2-3 hours from Chitina (where the road begins) to McCarthy.

If you have questions about alternative transportation options in and out of the McCarthy/Kennecott Area, you can refer to our Transportation Page.

How much elevation will I gain on the Glacier Hike?

We’re happy to say that the Root Glacier is a Valley Glacier, making access far easier than if it were high in the mountains. In fact, you will actually lose elevation to access the glacier! You’ll start your hike at roughly 2,000 feet and over the course of your day, you won’t gain or lose much more than 200 feet.

Is transportation included in the Kennecott Mill Town Tour?

No, we do not provide transportation for the Kennecott Mill Town Tour. If you are not staying in Kennecott, where the tour begins, you will need to find your own way up to Kennecott. To get between Kennecott and McCarthy most people ride the local Copper Town Shuttle (pricing and schedule change seasonally), however, you can also walk or bike the 4.5 miles between the two towns.

Is transportation included with my Glacier Activity?

Yes! We’re sensitive to the fact that there is no outside vehicle traffic allowed in McCarthy. On the day of your Glacier Activity, we do provide transportation. Your pick-up location and time will vary depending on where you’re lodging, so once you book a trip with us, please refer to your confirmation for your meeting instructions. If you are staying at a hotel within McCarthy/Kennecott, your lodging host will likely be picking you up upon your arrival, so be sure to check with them.

What are the differences between a Group Trip & Private Trip?

Group Trips are our standard trip option and mean that you’ll be in a mixed group. There is no guarantee that your group will be cohesive, and ability levels may vary wildly. If you’d like to ensure that you can go at a faster or slower pace, please consider booking a Private Trip. There is no opportunity to “turn around early” or hike independently on a Group Hike. 

Private Trips are just that – Private! These are a great option if you are a family, have mobility issues, or want to be able to explore at your own pace. Groups with an interpreter must book a Private Trip. If you have time constraints or need to start at a different time than our Group Trip, then a Private Trip will be the best option for you – please contact us if you need to discuss different timing options. On a Private Trip, it will be just your group and your guide.

How many people will be in my Group Trip?

Our group sizes vary depending on the activity you are participating in. Ideally, we max our group sizes at:

Half-Day Glacier Hike 1:8

Full-Day Glacier Hike 1:6

Ice Climbing 1:6

Raft & Flightsee 2:12

Kayaking 1:6

Alpine Hikes: Variable

Ice Cave Exploration: Variable

Fly-In Hikes & Kayaks: Always Private!

Ask us about upgrading to a Private Trip! Private Trips are not available for our Raft & Flightsee.

Can I do a Half-Day Glacier Hike and Kennecott Mill Town Tour on the same day?

Yes, it’s one of our most popular Day Trip options! Our Half-Day Glacier Hike starts at 9 am and usually ends between 2-3 pm, just in time to catch the 3:30 pm Kennecott Mill Town Tour.

Can I jump in a Blue Pool on my Glacier Hike?!

Absolutely! We recommend joining us for a Full-Day Glacier Hike if you’d like to jump into a Blue Pool, as the pools are not always accessible on a Half-Day Glacier Hike. If you’re interested in jumping into a Blue Pool, you may want to bring a bathing suit, change of clothes, and towel. But don’t worry, if you forget a suit or change of clothes, you can always jump in the buff!

Wondering what a Blue Pool is? It’s an area on a glacier where water collects. The water in the pool emits a beautiful turquoise color! These pools can often be very deep – perfect for diving into or doing a big old-fashioned cannonball! 

Do you offer crampon rentals?

No, we do not rent out crampons. However, if you join us for a Glacier Activity, crampons are included with your tour at no extra cost!

Are crampons included with my Glacier Hike?

Yes! Crampons are included with your glacier activity, at no extra cost. No additional technical gear is required, but we do recommend that you wear a sturdy hiking boot with ankle support.

What gear is included with my Ice Climb?

We provide all of the technical gear you’ll need for your day of Ice Climbing! That includes crampons, full-shank boots, a harness, ice tools, a rope, and a helmet. You will be carrying your crampons, boots, harness, and helmet, so be sure to bring a backpack!

What is your cancellation policy?

We have a very flexible cancellation policy:

Your payment is fully refundable up to 48 hours prior to the start of the trip, so if anything comes up prior to that time call or email us to cancel your reservation for a full refund. Within 48 hours, there is no refund for cancellations. In the rare event that we have to cancel a trip due to dangerous conditions, you will be notified and receive a full refund.

Are guns allowed on your tours?

Guns are not allowed on our Kennecott Mill Town Tour. The National Park Service does not allow guns within federally owned buildings and the Kennecott Mill Town Tour enters several federally owned buildings.

We strongly discourage but do not prohibit guns on our other day trip activities. If you do choose to carry a firearm while on a tour with us, we ask that you conceal it for the comfort of the other guests on your tour. Please note that our guides are well trained in bear safety, and the risk of a tour encountering an aggressive bear on our day trips is minimal.

Are dogs allowed on your tours?

Dogs are not allowed on any of our tours. Please note that the National Park Service has additional rules and regulations regarding Pets in the Park.

What is the difference between a Half-Day & Full-Day Glacier Hike?

We get asked this question a lot – and it’s a good one!

Both Glacier Hikes take the same 2.5 mile trail to the Root Glacier. However, on our Half-Day Glacier Hike you’ll hike an average of 5 miles over the course of 5-6 hours, while on the Full Day Hike you’ll hike closer to 8-11 miles over the course of 8-9 hours. 

In general the Full-Day Glacier Hike is much more strenuous. You’ll get to go further out on the glacier, where the terrain can be more challenging and varied. Because you get further out on the glacier there is a chance you won’t see another group for hours! We consider our Full-Day Glacier Hike more exploratory and there is no set route.

We recommend that you join us for a Full-Day Glacier Hike if you’d like to jump into a Blue Pool, as the pools are not always accessible on a Half-Day Glacier Hike. 

On both hikes you get to see incredible glacial features, learn about our local environment (including some glaciology), and interact with a surreal landscape that you’ll remember forever! You can’t go wrong no matter which hike you choose!

Should I bring trekking poles for my glacier hike?

We do not recommend trekking poles for the glacier portion of your trek. Trekking poles can be helpful for the 2-mile hike to the glacier, but are not required or necessary for all hikers. If you decide to bring trekking poles with you for your trek, please make sure they can easily break down so that you can store them on/in your pack while exploring the glacier.

Do your day activities have age limits?

Each activity that we offer is unique and requires a different skills set that may not be suitable for all ages. Here are the age limits for our Day Trips:

Kennecott Mill Town Tour – All ages are welcome! Please keep in mind that there are steep stairs that all participants must be able to navigate independently. A hands free carrier is required for those 2 and under.

Half-Day Glacier Hike – All ages are welcome! Consider that you will hike between 5-6 miles. A hands free carrier is recommended for young children. A Private Trip is a great choice depending on the ages and abilities of your kids.

Full-Day Glacier Hike – All ages are welcome! Consider that you will hike between 8-11 miles. A hands free carrier is recommended for young children. To give your family the ultimate flexibility, a Private Trip is a great choice depending on the ages and abilities of your kids.

Ice Climbing – We recommend participants be 8 years old or older. Participants are expected to swing ice tools that can weigh between 2-5 lbs and use their own strength to move themself up the wall. Please consider your kid’s capabilities! We strongly encourage that families with children under 8 years old book a Private Trip. 

Raft & Flightsee – We require participants be 8 years old or older. Participants must be able to hold on to the boat independently and be able to quickly and fully follow instructions given by the guide.

Kayaking Trips – We require participants be 3 years old or older. 

Fly-In Hiking Trips – All ages are welcome! A hands free carrier is strongly recommended for those 2 or under. 

 

How long have you guys been around?

St. Elias Alpine Guides was started in McCarthy in 1978 by legendary climber Bob Jacobs who wanted to explore even more remote wilds and was feeling like Denali was getting too crowded even back in the 70s! The current owners worked as guides for the company for many years before taking over the business and are only the third generation of owners in 40 years! We’ve been around longer than the Park itself and are the longest continually operating business in the area. We are proud of our long and consistent legacy in the most magnificent wilderness on earth! To learn more about us, click here.

Why are you way out in middle of nowhere?

What can we say, we love the wilderness! The founder of St. Elias Alpine Guides, legendary climber Bob Jacobs, thought that Denali was too crowded even back in the 70s! The lifestyle that comes with living in a teeny, remote and completely off-the-grid community in the middle of the world’s largest protected wilderness requires hard work and a sense of adventure, both passions of ours. We like the type of people who come here as well – you have to want it! We invite you to study up on Wrangell-St. Elias and McCarthy-Kennecott and come see what’s at the end of the 60mi dirt road!

How do I get to you?

We are located in the heart of Wrangell – St. Elias National Park. There is a 60mi dirt road that connects us to the highway system and there is also an airstrip in town!

There are several options for getting to McCarthy-Kennecott – driving, riding in a van shuttle, taking a scheduled or chartered flight, or some combination of these options. Please visit our transportation page for more detailed information.

Where do I stay once I’m there?

Even though we are a remote and completely off-the-grid community, we’ve got some great lodging options in our area! There are historic wilderness lodges and hotels, small cabins, BnBs, and a big campground, too! Please visit our lodging recommendations page for more information.

What is there to do in McCarthy/Kennecott?

McCarthy-Kennecott is located right in the middle of the largest protected wilderness area on the planet and is the off-the-beaten-path adventure capital of South-Central Alaska. If you’re looking for hiking, climbing, backpacking, rafting, or mountaineering without the crowds of Denali or the Kenai Penninsula, you’ve come to the right place!

The massive Root and Kennicott Glaciers almost spill into town and are towered over by the Stairway Icefall (largest in Alaska) and the enormous Mt. Blackburn (16,391 ft)! In fact, 7 out of the 10 tallest peaks in America find their home amongst the 3 major mountain ranges in Wrangell-St. Elias National Park. Down on the coast, Mount St. Elias itself rises from the ocean to the mighty height of 18,008ft, claiming its name as the 2nd tallest peak in the States! We offer day trips and multi-day adventures exploring this amazing wilderness and there are a few different trails and areas you can explore on your own too – just stop by our office for a map and some recommendations!

The abandoned townsite of Kennecott and well-preserved buildings and artifacts of a thriving prospecting community provide fascinating historical context to this unique convergence of topographical wonders. The obvious highlight and high point of the townsite is the 14-story Mill Building, the tallest wooden structure in North America! The old townsite and some of the buildings are open to the public during the summer so there’s a lot you can explore on your own – make sure to also check out the Museum in McCarthy, too! If you want to take a deeper dive back in time and access the inside of the Mill Building, join us on our 2hr Historical Tour of Kennecott. There are a couple of lodging and food options in Kennecott as well as a gift shop with espresso drinks!

McCarthy is a small community located about 4.5mi down the road from Kennecott. You will find the McCarthy Museum here, a small mercantile, a gift shop, and a few restaurants, including the only bar for hundreds of miles around! There are a few lodging options right in town too, the local air taxi’s office as well as a shuttle stop for transportation to and from Kennecott.

 

 

What should I bring for my trip?

Whether you are joining us for a Day Trip or a longer Multi-Day Adventure, we have created a specialized packing list for you to consult as you are preparing for your trip. Our equipment lists are thoughtfully curated and have been refined over the decades we’ve been running trips – each item has a purpose! You can find all our Equipment Lists here or on each trip’s individual page. Be aware that there is no gear store in McCarthy-Kennecott so please come as prepared as possible. Please let us know if you have more specific questions on what to bring!

What is the best time to visit?

The best time to visit McCarthy/Kennecott and the Wrangells is June-September. This is when most of the backcountry is accessible, the National Park Service operations are running and most businesses in town, including lodging accommodations and restaurants, are open.

We start our mountaineering trips in early May, but most of our other tours are available starting Memorial Day weekend!

At the end of May it is still very quiet in town and can be a great time to avoid the crowds, however, it is still a little chilly, the bugs are just starting to come out and no fly-in destinations are accessible for hiking and backpacking. The sun sets really, really late and only for a brief time.

June remains a little quieter as the season builds up but by mid-June the wildflowers start coming out and the weather warms up significantly. Most backcountry strips become accessible toward the end of the month. The mosquitoes start to get thick toward mid-month but are easy to avoid on the glacier or while moving around. The sun won’t set until the end of August, so enjoy the land of the midnight sun!

July is considered prime-time in the Wrangells, with the warmest and typically sunniest weather and wildflowers in full bloom! It also means that this is the most popular time of year to visit so you may see more people around town than usual, especially around the 4th of July, Independence Day, holiday. July is also our heaviest mosquito time but the bugs are quite easy to avoid and not that bad, altogether. All backcountry destinations are usually accessible all month.

August continues all the joys of July, however, the mosquitoes die down significantly! The weather tends to be a bit more fickle this month, but it’s still a very pop[ular time of year to visit. Toward the very end of the month, you can catch the leaves and tundra changing colors, getting ready for fall and sun finally starting to set.

In September, the fall colors are out and they are incredible! The mosquitoes are gone too! This month can be a little cooler so you’ll want to pack some warmer layers, and most backcountry strips are still available to fly in and out of. It’s much quieter around town as the season winds down, and if you’re lucky you may catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights!

All that said, remember that Alaska’s mountain weather changes frequently and can surprise even an experienced outdoorsman! It’s been known to snow in July, not rain at all, or rain almost every day of the summer, so be prepared for just about anything!

It is also possible to visit the park in the “winter months” however please be advised that access is difficult and little support is available. We do not provide tours, shuttles, trip planning or any other kind of support or services for personal trips to the Park during the winter.

How do I get around town once I arrive?

Regardless of how you arrive in McCarthy, be advised that no outside vehicles are permitted within the town, so don’t plan on being able to drive yourself around. Uber and taxi services are a laughable concept out here in the bush…you’ll see!

Within the towns of Kennecott and McCarthy, all local businesses and points of attraction are within walking distance.

To get between Kennecott and McCarthy most people ride the local Copper Town Shuttle (pricing and schedule change seasonally), however, you can also walk or bike the 4.5mi between the two towns.

The Footbridge at the end of the McCarthy Road is about a 20min walk from McCarthy. The Copper Town Shuttle also offers service to the Footbridge on a regular schedule.

Most local lodging hosts will provide transportation for check-in and check-out so you should be able to get to your accommodations from either the Footbridge if you’re driving in or from the airstrip if you’re flying in – check with your host for more details.

If you’re doing an activity with us, chances are we provide transportation! Check with us if you are unsure if transportation is provided for your activity.

What is the condition of the McCarthy Road?

The condition of the road varies during the course of the Summer Season (May-September), and travel is not advised during the Winter Months (November-April). If you do choose to drive down the McCarthy Road in the Summer you should keep the following in mind:

  • It is a 60-mile gravel road.
  • There are many potholes and frost heaves along the way.
  • There are narrow sections of road and soft shoulders.
  • Sharp rocks and old railroad spikes can cause flat tires, you should always travel with a spare.
  • Landslides have been known to occur on certain sections of the road, blocking progress.
  • Travel is slow going, and you shouldn’t go any more than ~35 miles per hour.
  • Always allot more time to travel the road than you think you need, we recommend 2-3 hours from Chitina (where the road begins) to McCarthy.

If you have questions about alternative transportation options in and out of the McCarthy/Kennecott Area, you can refer to our Transportation Page.

Is there cell coverage in McCarthy/Kennecott?

Verizon is the only major service provider that works in the towns of McCarthy and Kennecott. GCI has been reported to work in the area, but it isn’t always reliable. It is important to note that service is spotty along the McCarthy Road, and there is no service in the backcountry of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park & Preserve.

Is there WiFi in McCarthy/Kennecott?

There is no public WiFi in the area. We highly recommend that you enjoy the chance to unplug, unwind, and explore the beautiful Kennicott Valley! However, if you do need WiFi, many lodging options in the Kennicott Valley provide internet for their guests – check with your lodging host if you need WiFi.

What is the Footbridge?

The towns of McCarthy and Kennecott are closed to outside vehicle traffic, and the Footbridge is the only way for visitors to enter the area. The Footbridge is a pedestrian bridge that crosses over the Kennicott River and is located at the end of the McCarthy Road.

You can pay to park your car at the Base Camp Kennicott Campground at the end of the McCarthy Road. To access the towns of McCarthy and Kennecott, you’ll want to cross the Footbridge. Once on the other side, there are a few different ways to get to where you need to go:

  1. If you need to get to your lodging, check with your lodging host to arrange a pick-up with them. 
  2. If you need to get around the area for the day, there is a local shuttle service that provides rides up to Kennecott at a cost. However, you can always ride your bike or walk the ½ mile to McCarthy or the 5 miles to Kennecott. There are no bike rentals available in the area.
  3. If you’re joining us for a glacier activity, rafting trip, or fly-in hike – transportation is included! Once you’ve booked a trip with us, check your confirmation for more information.
Are guns allowed on your tours?

Guns are not allowed on our Kennecott Mill Town Tour. The National Park Service does not allow guns within federally owned buildings and the Kennecott Mill Town Tour enters several federally owned buildings.

We strongly discourage but do not prohibit guns on our other day trip activities. If you do choose to carry a firearm while on a tour with us, we ask that you conceal it for the comfort of the other guests on your tour. Please note that our guides are well trained in bear safety, and the risk of a tour encountering an aggressive bear on our day trips is minimal.

Are dogs allowed on your tours?

Dogs are not allowed on any of our tours. Please note that the National Park Service has additional rules and regulations regarding Pets in the Park.

What is an “Alaskan Mile”?

If you’ve ever talked to us here at SEAG and asked “What is the mileage of the route?” chances are you’ve heard some hesitation and a vague answer. Why is that? The answer is simple, mileage here isn’t straight forward. The mileage for some of our longer 8-day backpacking trips is often around 25-30 miles. If you’re an avid backpacker, you’re likely thinking “that’s it?!” – yup, that’s it. BUT that’s 25-30 “Alaskan miles.” So what are Alaskan miles? These are miles that are not defined by a route, which mean on-site navigation over some pretty epic terrain that can include, step elevation gain and loss, side-hilling, glacial travel, creek crossings,  bush-whacking, and more! While the miles you hike in the backcountry of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park will be tough, they’ll also be some of the most rewarding hiking of your life.

How do I decide what trip to do?

All the pictures and descriptions sound amazing! How do I know what’s right for me? Here are some things to think about when selecting a trip:

  • What is my #1 goal for this adventure? Do I want to relax and get away from a hectic schedule? Do I want to push myself on an epic and athletically challenging journey? Create life-long memories with my family or partner? Learn skills from the experts and grow my scope as a mountain athlete? See new landscapes and experience Alaska’s unique glaciated terrain?
  • What are my interests? Birding, animals, photography, geology, wildflowers, journaling, athleticism, spirituality, art, technical climbing, etc.
  • Will this trip be part of a bigger Alaska trip? Where else am I going and what else will I see? Our glaciated terrain, history, high-altitude peaks, and vast backcountry wilderness are what set us apart from other areas in Alaska.
  • What am I comfortable with at my current level of knowledge, experience, and physical and mental ability? Alaska is bigger and tougher than anything in the lower 48 and it’s a great place to push yourself, but you want to be realistic and make sure you have a good foundation to build upon if reaching for higher heights.
  • What type of adventure is right for me?
    • On Basecamp Hiking Trips we fly out into the wilderness and set up camp near the airstrip. From here we explore the area on a series of day hikes with lighter packs and return to the same camp every night.
      • Basecamp Hiking Trips are recommended for beginner campers, families with younger children, and those with injuries that may prevent them from carrying a heavy pack. We also recommend these trips for those looking for a more relaxing experience, though please note that all the terrain in the Wrangells is quite rugged so some level of athleticism is always required to get around the wilderness.
    • On Basecamp mini-Backpacking Trips we fly to a backcountry destination and strap on our heavy backpacks, taking a short hike to set up our first camp. Over several days, we will explore different areas on day-hikes, moving camp at least once again.
      • Basecamp mini-Backpacking Trips are perfect for those newer to camping and backpacking or those looking for a less physically strenuous backpacking experience in rugged Alaska. Great for kids 12 and up!
    • On Point-to-Point Backpacking Trips we take 4-8 days to get from backcountry destination A to backcountry destination B, moving camp every night, being completely self-sufficient, and carrying all our gear on our backs.
      • Our Backpacking Trips are different in difficulty as well as terrain and scenery and each presents a unique series of challenges. Alaska requires more and burlier gear which means heavier packs and the terrain and weather can be relentless – do not underestimate the challenges a trail-less wilderness presents! We do not offer any “easy” backpacking trips and do not recommend these trips for first-time or beginner backpackers.
    • On Rafting trips we usually spend 2-6hrs on the river every day, stopping for lunch and short, scenic hikes before making a camp in the wilderness. Our rafting trips are scenic floats, allowing access to otherwise unattainable views and covering more miles than you ever could on foot, with some class II-III rapids in between. Rafting trips allow a slightly more “luxurious” wilderness experience than backpacking or basecamp hiking – easier on the legs, a more casual daily schedule with more time at camp, no backpack burden, more elaborate meals with fresher ingredients, etc.
      • We raft a few different rivers in the Wrangells and each has unique scenery and logistics, some involving bush flights and some ending way out on the coast! We recommend our rafting trips to anyone looking for a wilderness experience at a very comfortable pace, those wanting to spend quality time with their group, or those hoping to relax while still seeing a lot. Kids ages 8+ are welcome.
    •  On Mountaineering Expeditions we access remote big-mountain terrain, usually landing on ski planes to climb and ski some of the tallest peaks in Alaska’s endless mountain kingdom! We offer small-group objective-based expeditions where the goal is to safely summit and descend a remote peak, play-style expeditions where we set up a basecamp to access some shorter but epic lines, and technical courses where the goal is to learn and practice mountaineering techniques and skills (see below). We climb and ski in a wilderness style – there are no fixed lines, no sherpas, no busy basecamp scenes and established camps, no weather stations, and usually no one on the mountain except our team. This is a different style of climbing and takes strong mental and physical fortitude as teams must be completely self-sustained. All mountaineering trips include Trip Packages with transportation and lodging logistics included (Anchorage to Anchorage).
      • Our mountaineering expeditions are recommended for those looking to access some of the most remote and wild mountain terrain on the planet. Each trip has a difficulty level, requires vetting and a mountaineering resume. Some trips require guide references.
    •  On Technical Courses the goal is to learn technical skills and put them into practice on Alaska’s unique glaciated terrain. Our courses vary in length and can be highly customizable
      • Technical Courses are recommended for those wanting to focus on skill-building and excited to learn in an incredible outdoor classroom. All skill levels are welcome. We are not affiliated with any learning institution and these courses do not provide any type of certification. That said, we hope that what we teach you and your experience is memorable and transforms your mountain confidence and abilities!

 

Get in Touch!

Still have questions? Schedule a call with our Expedition Coordinator  – she’ll help you narrow down which trip is best for you and answer any questions you have about our trips, the local area, or surrounding logistics!
CLICK HERE to schedule a call at a time that works well for you.

Who will my multi-day guide be?

Our wilderness trip guides are the best of the best! They have worked for us as day guides for at least one full season, have extensive experience in the backcountry, advanced wilderness medical training, a good head on their shoulders, and are also fun and personable people to spend a few days or a few weeks with. They love what they do and want to make sure you have the best experience possible. Our guides come in many shapes and sizes and from many different backgrounds – you can get to know them here. We assign guides to individual trips 2-4 weeks prior to the trip and do our best to match their personalities to yours and your group’s. Your guide plans to contact you 1-2 weeks before the trip to introduce themselves and answer any last minute questions you might have. Our schedule is as dynamic as our environment and we apologize if this doesn’t happen or isn’t as timely due to busy schedules and/or last-minute scheduling additions and changes.

Where do we go to the bathroom?

This is one of the most commonly asked questions!

We practice Leave No Trace principles and make sure to minimize our impact on the natural landscape as much as possible.

In Wrangell-St. Elias National Park, the recommended practice for backpackers is to either individually dig small holes (your guide will carry a small trowel) to use as a personal latrine per-use or choose a place near camp but with some privacy and dig a trench for use as a group latrine, depending on the location. You will carry out all your used toilet paper and all other sanitary products and trash.

On rafting trips, we carry a plastic toilet box with a seat that is set up near camp and your guides will carry out all waste on the boats.

On mountaineering trips, the latrine is commonly a crevasse or snow-pit protected from camp by a wall of snow.

Your guides will instruct you on the particulars of the situation per camp to set you up for success and all possible comfort. Please don’t be shy to ask them questions on this matter. It’s a necessity that has been given lots of thought your guides are experts in ALL things outdoors!

Do I have to carry my own gear?

Likely, at some point or another, at least a little bit, yes.

 

On a Rafting Trip, you can help the guides unload the boats, set up camp, and carry your dry bag(s) to your tent nearby. After breakfast, you can help take down camp and load up the boats.

 

On a Basecamp Hiking Trip, you will need to carry your gear about 5-20min from the backcountry airstrip to set up camp at the beginning of the trip and then pack up and carry it back to the airstrip at the end. Throughout the trip you will hike with a small day pack – this is usually 5-15lbs.

 

On a Basecamp mini-Backpacking Trip you will need to carry all your gear between the airstrip and your camp, which will be 1-3mi away. This means at least 2 one-way trips with the big backpack (usually 30-40lbs). After setting up camp you will enjoy day-hikes with a much lighter day pack (usually 5-15lbs).

 

On a Backpacking Trip, you will move camp almost every night and will need to carry everything you need with you. For a trip up to 4 days in length, you can expect packs in the 35-45lb range and for trips in the 6-8 day range, please be prepared for weights closer to 45-50lbs. The burly gear that is required for the Alaskan backcountry isn’t very light so forget “ultralite” and think heavy-duty!

 

For all Basecamping and Backpacking Trips, the pack weight will really depend on what you bring, so we do recommend having a minimalist mindset. In addition to your own gear, we will be giving you a bear canister full of food and supplies, potentially another item like a fuel canister or a stove, and maybe a part of a tent if you’re not bringing your own (we recommend sharing tents to save weight). Your guides are weight-conscious packers and will never burden you unnecessarily. It’s likely that over the course of the trip you’ll be able to start adding your own things into the bear canister and your pack should get lighter as you eat your food and use supplies. 

If you would really like to do a Point-to-Point Backpacking Trip but are concerned about the pack weight, we also offer Porter services. Porters cannot take your entire pack for you, but they can help alleviate your pack weight significantly and offer other assistance as an assistant guide on the trip.

 

On our objective-based Mountaineering Expeditions, you will be required to carry all your own gear and some group gear between camps. Depending on the terrain, you may bring sleds with you for all or some of the route. Depending on the route, you may do stretches of the route multiple times, caching gear as you go, so you may not always have the full weight of all your equipment with you at all times. At maximum, you can expect weights of 80-160lbs to be split between a backpack and a sled and at minimum a 30lb bag for single-day excursions.

What about the bears?!

Wrangell – St. Elias National Park is home to both black bears and grizzly bears and we are honored to share our home with such majestic animals. We treat the bears with respect and do our best to maintain their wild environment and nature. The bears out here are truly very wild and have very little contact with humans – this means that they are naturally afraid of us! Yes, even grizzlies! Bears do not hunt humans and our most common bear sighting is of a bear’s butt as they run away.

Although bear sightings may be exciting, we do our best to avoid close encounters with preventative measures at camp and while hiking that our guides will share with you. Just in case of unusually close encounters, our guides carry flare guns (to scare a bear away) and pepper spray (in case of an uncomfortably close meeting). It is very uncommon to have to use either.

If you want to, you can bring your own bear spray too, however, know that your guide has one and has been trained on how to use it. With 40 years of guiding in the Park, we have found that being bear aware, taking preventative measures and the flare gun and pepper spray to be sufficient mitigations.

Please refrain from bringing firearms with you on our trips. Not only does this make our other guests and guides uncomfortable, but they are also completely unnecessary for bear safety. We know that other areas of Alaska may recommend firearms for bear safety, but we specifically recommend against them.

What will we eat?

We pride ourselves on cooking healthy and delicious meals even under the most adverse conditions! Your exact menu will depend on the trip, your guide, and the dietary preferences/restrictions you list in your Trip Application. No matter what kind of cook your guide is at home, all our guides are well-trained backcountry chefs and use time-tested recipes from our proprietary cookbook for their trips. We carry a plentiful and varied stock of ingredients and most meals are prepared from scratch (allowing for easy substitutions, additions or subtractions of ingredients). We do not use pre-packed freeze-dried meals, except for summit pushes on our mountaineering expeditions.

On our backpacking, basecamp-hiking, and mountaineering trips, you can expect 3 meals a day, plus snacks of your choice while in the backcountry. We use a combination of fresh, dehydrated, and freeze-dried ingredients to make our delicious meals, however on longer backpacking and mountaineering trips your guides will use more freeze-dried foods than fresh foods to keep pack weights as low as possible. On our rafting trips, we cook full multi-course meals with fresh ingredients. Meals start with Lunch on the first day and end with Lunch on the last day. *

*If you are signed up for a Custom Trip Package with us, it may include more meals. Check with us if you’re not sure. Mountaineering trips also include meals in McCarthy before and after the backcountry expedition.

Can you accommodate my dietary needs/preferences?

We can accommodate most dietary restrictions and even preferences, too! Please be honest and open with your guides about what you can and cannot eat, why, and what will happen if you do. Don’t worry if it’s just a preference – there’s no need to pick out the mushrooms out of every meal when they could easily just be left out.

Because our guides prepare most meals completely from scratch it’s easy for them to add, leave out or substitute ingredients. They are attuned to the consequences of cross-contamination and prep and cook meals with great care when dealing with an allergen or an upsetting ingredient. We have never had any food-related allergic reactions or major issues arise in the field.

We ask that you are realistic about how you want to eat in the backcountry. If you follow a very strict diet at home, consider making exceptions while on the trip as your body will be extra stressed and comfort foods will seem much more appealing out there. We also want to make sure you’re getting enough calories, protein, and other nutrients. If you tell your guides you don’t eat pork, they won’t pack you any bacon, and then when breakfast rolls around and you can hear it sizzling in the pan, that delicious bacon smell is in the air, and everyone else is crunchin’ on crispy bacon strips……you’ll be eating drool for breakfast! If you tell us you eat vegan, we will pack you amazing and delicious vegan meals, so don’t count on stealing anyone’s cheese and jerky if it turns out you actually make exceptions for tasty treats! Be realistic, and communicate honestly.

If you have a highly specialized diet for health reasons and we are not able to accommodate it, we will work with you to find a feasible alternative.

Should I tip my multi-day guide? How much?

Tipping is customary in our industry and accounts for a significant portion of a guide’s income. Tips can make guiding a feasible career choice in the long term and are always appreciated. It is hard to use a percentage scale as a guideline for tipping on our trips because the costs of trips are often hugely influenced by things like bush flights and logistics that are outside of our guides’ control.

A good rule of thumb is $50-$150 per day per guide total from the entire participant group, however, tips should still reflect the quality of the service. If your guides made this the trip of a lifetime, the sky’s the limit!

What should I bring for my trip?

Whether you are joining us for a Day Trip or a longer Multi-Day Adventure, we have created a specialized packing list for you to consult as you are preparing for your trip. Our equipment lists are thoughtfully curated and have been refined over the decades we’ve been running trips – each item has a purpose! You can find all our Equipment Lists here or on each trip’s individual page. Be aware that there is no gear store in McCarthy-Kennecott so please come as prepared as possible. Please let us know if you have more specific questions on what to bring!

Where can I store my luggage while I’m in the backcountry?

We understand that you may have luggage or things you don’t want to bring into the backcountry with you so we have a designated area at our headquarters where your guide will label and store your stuff while you’re out. This area is not locked, however, we have never had any issues with loss or damage. If you have a small item of great value that you are particularly nervous about, we may be able to store it in our office for you – just ask your guide.

What’s included in the cost of my trip?
  • Your professional guides!
    • Our guides are top-of-the-line professionals in everything that they do, whether navigating and helping you through difficult terrain or cooking up an amazing backcountry meal! All of our backcountry guides are carefully assigned, have been with the company for at least a year, must pass our extensive backcountry training, and hold a WFR or higher medical certification. (Occasionally lead guides are assisted by junior guides who may not meet all those qualifications.)
    • Our guides are experts in these environments and will enrich your experience with their knowledge of the local history, geology, flora, and fauna to create incredible and memorable experiences. Bring your binoculars and get ready to explore the wilderness in depth!
    • Our guides come in all shapes and sizes, from different backgrounds, and have different personalities – we can always find the best guide for you! Whether you’re looking for a physical challenge, to learn new skills, or just to get away from it all and experience the solace of the wilderness, we’ll find you the perfect match. Our guides will cater the experience to you, providing more or less support, instruction, photos, facts, or jokes based on your needs and desires!
    • Meet our guides!
  • Bush flights!
    • Most of our trips take place deep in the backcountry of Wrangell – St. Elias National Park and are accessed by bush planes! These scenic flights allow you to see even more of this amazing National Park and are a thrilling way to begin and/or end a backcountry trip!
    • We do have hike-in/hike-out trips available too! There is some really incredible terrain right in our backyard – the Kennicott Valley and it can be accessed by foot. A few miles out of town and you are already in the wilderness!
  • Food!
    • We will provide all the food on the backcountry trip! Regardless of what kind of cooks your guides are at home, they are trained backcountry chefs and work with tried and true proprietary recipes and get great reviews!
    • Because we make most of our meals entirely from scratch, we have the ability to customize menus and be flexible with ingredients. We have no problem accommodating most dietary restrictions and preferences – just let your guide know exactly what you cannot or do not eat and why and they’ll leave it out or keep it on the side.
    • Check out some of our most popular Wilderness Recipes!
  • Gear!
    • We always provide all group gear like bear canisters (or other food storage/protection), cookware, and fuel.
      • For backpacking or backcountry hiking trips requiring glacier crossings, we will also provide you with a set of crampons that are compatible with most boot types.
      • For rafting trips, we’ll also provide all the necessary rafting equipment as well as a PFD and some dry bags for you.
      • For climbing courses or mountaineering expeditions, we’ll also provide ropes and some other group gear like 4-season expedition tents, pickets, ice screws, ice tools, camp shovels, etc. depending on the adventure.
    • Generally, you are responsible for your sleeping pad, sleeping bag, backpack(s), clothing, toiletries, and any other personal gear you want to bring.
      • Check out our Equipment Lists – these are general lists of gear that you are responsible for. Your guide may have more specific recommendations based on your route.
    • We always recommend you use as much of your gear as you can because you are familiar with it. We understand that you may not have adequate gear or it may be difficult to travel with so we do have some items available for rent. Please note that gear rentals are not the main focus of our business so we have a limited selection of items available and may not always have your size. Ask us ahead of time to make rental reservations.
    • We highly recommend that you use your own tent*, but we understand that may not be possible. You can use our tents at no extra cost – just let us know if you need them or if you’re bringing your own. If you are participating solo on a Group backpacking or backcountry hiking trip, you will likely be assigned a tentmate.
      *We do not expect you to come with your own 4-season expedition tent and will always provide those for mountaineering and ski trips. If you don’t come with a partner, you will likely get a tentmate or two.
What about the logistics surrounding this trip?

Our multi-day trips begin with an Orientation and Gear Shakedown – the day before your trip begins you’ll need to be in McCarthy to meet your guide, grab group gear and make sure you are fully prepared to go into the backcountry. Because our weather is so hard to predict, this is a great time to ask them any last-minute gear questions – “this jacket or this fleece?” This meeting will be organized by your guide when they reach out to you, about 10 days before the trip.

Most people arrive in McCarthy the day before the trip and leave the day after the trip, but some like to come to McCarthy a little earlier or stay a couple of days later to join us for a Day Trip or rest up and enjoy the quiet town. We don’t recommend leaving McCarthy the last day of your trip as this not only cuts into your last backcountry day but also doesn’t allow time for any weather-related delays (which are not uncommon).

Check out our Transportation Page to learn how to get to and from McCarthy. Check out our Lodging Page for lodging recommendations in the area.

If you are planning your trip +2 months before your trip start date, ask us about upgrading to a Trip Package! A Trip Package will include transportation, lodging, other activities, and any other logistics you need in addition to your backcountry trip. We specialize in activities and areas in or near Wrangell – St. Elias so we can put together an amazing itinerary for you, showcasing the best of this corner of Alaska!

If you’re looking to connect your time in the Wrangells with other adventures in Alaska you may consider adding a day of salmon fishing on the Copper River, driving to Nabesna on the North side of the Park for some epic hiking, flying to the remote town of Cordova for sea kayaking or driving to Valdez for some deep-sea fishing, whale watching, and other water activities!

*Mountaineering expeditions and ski trips work on a slightly different schedule and transportation to/from McCarthy as well as basic lodging at our historic bunkrooms is included in trip costs. The Copper River Rafting Trip has different logistics, starting in Chitina and ending in Cordova. The Chitina River Rafting Trip begins the same in McCarthy but ends in Chitina.

What’s the difference between a Group Trip and a Private Trip?

Most of our Multi-day Trips are offered in both a Group or Private Trip format.

Group Trips have set dates and are made up of individual travelers or smaller parties like couples who don’t know each other but are excited to adventure together! On a Group Trip, you’ll meet new people with similar interests and be able to spread the costs of the trip resulting in a lower per-person rate. We need a minimum of 3 people to run a Group Trip at the Group Rate and they max out at 8 participants for land-based trips and 12 participants for rafting trips. Learn more about Trip Minimums here.

Private Trips have custom dates and are just for your party. Private Trips are great for families, especially those with young children, close groups of friends or couples just wanting to spend time together, or those with special interests like photography or birding that they want to focus on during the trip. On a Private Trip, the entire experience is customized to your party and you don’t have to compromise to anyone else’s interests or abilities. Private Trips can be for just one, solo adventurer or get as big as 12 participants for larger groups.

For both Group and Private Trips, we work with a ratio of 1:4 for land-based trips, 1:3 for rafting trips, and 1:2-3 for mountaineering and ski trips. This helps with any pacing or interest discrepancies and provides additional support for bigger groups.

What is the best time to visit?

The best time to visit McCarthy/Kennecott and the Wrangells is June-September. This is when most of the backcountry is accessible, the National Park Service operations are running and most businesses in town, including lodging accommodations and restaurants, are open.

We start our mountaineering trips in early May, but most of our other tours are available starting Memorial Day weekend!

At the end of May it is still very quiet in town and can be a great time to avoid the crowds, however, it is still a little chilly, the bugs are just starting to come out and no fly-in destinations are accessible for hiking and backpacking. The sun sets really, really late and only for a brief time.

June remains a little quieter as the season builds up but by mid-June the wildflowers start coming out and the weather warms up significantly. Most backcountry strips become accessible toward the end of the month. The mosquitoes start to get thick toward mid-month but are easy to avoid on the glacier or while moving around. The sun won’t set until the end of August, so enjoy the land of the midnight sun!

July is considered prime-time in the Wrangells, with the warmest and typically sunniest weather and wildflowers in full bloom! It also means that this is the most popular time of year to visit so you may see more people around town than usual, especially around the 4th of July, Independence Day, holiday. July is also our heaviest mosquito time but the bugs are quite easy to avoid and not that bad, altogether. All backcountry destinations are usually accessible all month.

August continues all the joys of July, however, the mosquitoes die down significantly! The weather tends to be a bit more fickle this month, but it’s still a very pop[ular time of year to visit. Toward the very end of the month, you can catch the leaves and tundra changing colors, getting ready for fall and sun finally starting to set.

In September, the fall colors are out and they are incredible! The mosquitoes are gone too! This month can be a little cooler so you’ll want to pack some warmer layers, and most backcountry strips are still available to fly in and out of. It’s much quieter around town as the season winds down, and if you’re lucky you may catch a glimpse of the Northern Lights!

All that said, remember that Alaska’s mountain weather changes frequently and can surprise even an experienced outdoorsman! It’s been known to snow in July, not rain at all, or rain almost every day of the summer, so be prepared for just about anything!

It is also possible to visit the park in the “winter months” however please be advised that access is difficult and little support is available. We do not provide tours, shuttles, trip planning or any other kind of support or services for personal trips to the Park during the winter.

How do I get around town once I arrive?

Regardless of how you arrive in McCarthy, be advised that no outside vehicles are permitted within the town, so don’t plan on being able to drive yourself around. Uber and taxi services are a laughable concept out here in the bush…you’ll see!

Within the towns of Kennecott and McCarthy, all local businesses and points of attraction are within walking distance.

To get between Kennecott and McCarthy most people ride the local Copper Town Shuttle (pricing and schedule change seasonally), however, you can also walk or bike the 4.5mi between the two towns.

The Footbridge at the end of the McCarthy Road is about a 20min walk from McCarthy. The Copper Town Shuttle also offers service to the Footbridge on a regular schedule.

Most local lodging hosts will provide transportation for check-in and check-out so you should be able to get to your accommodations from either the Footbridge if you’re driving in or from the airstrip if you’re flying in – check with your host for more details.

If you’re doing an activity with us, chances are we provide transportation! Check with us if you are unsure if transportation is provided for your activity.

What is the booking process for a multi-day trip?

Take some time to figure out what trips you’re interested in, what dates you’re available and if you’re interested in joining a Group Trip or starting your own Private Trip. Reach out to us if you have any questions – we’ve been doing this for over 40 years so we are experts at matching you to the perfect trip! We also like to vet you to make sure you’re signing up for the best possible trip for you, so don’t hesitate to get in touch with us when making these decisions.

If your trip is bookable online, go ahead and sign up! If it’s not, reach out to us by phone or email and we’ll get you signed up over the phone or send you a special link to book online.

At the time of booking, we collect a deposit to hold your spot on the trip – $500 for just the Trip or $1,000 for a Trip Package or a Mountaineering Trip. You will get a confirmation email with some more details about the trip and how to prepare.

The balance is due 30 days before the trip begins and we’ll reach out to you via email to collect that balance. If you have signed up for a Trip Package, we will send you a Detailed Itinerary outlining everything you need to know about your upcoming trip AFTER we’ve received your final payment, roughly a month before the trip begins.

Your guide will then reach out to you to introduce themselves, answer any remaining questions, and set up a meeting time for Orientation.

What is the cancellation policy for multi-day trips and trip packages?

We want you to feel comfortable booking your adventures with us knowing that anything can happen between now and then. Please let us know if you have special, more extreme circumstances that you feel are not covered by our policy.

Multi-Day Trip and Trip Package Cancellation Policy:

If you cancel before 30 days of the itinerary start date you are eligible to receive a 90% refund of any payments made.*

If you cancel within 14-30 days of the itinerary start date you are eligible for a 50% refund of any payments made.*

No refunds are offered for cancellations within 14 days of the itinerary start date.*

 

*Instead of getting a refund, you can always choose to hold the entirety of your payments with us and apply them to a future trip if you prefer. (If you choose this option, you forgo the option to receive a refund later.)

When should I book my Multi-Day Trip?

We usually start to take bookings for multi-day trips in the late fall – sign up for our newsletter to make sure you don’t miss our season opener!

The booking process can take a few weeks as you decide on your Trip and Trip Package details and requires back and forth communication with our office staff.

We recommend booking your Backpacking, Basecamp Hiking, Basecamp mini-Backpacking and Rafting Trips between November and May. The earlier you sign up, the more flexibility we’ll have to accommodate you, and the more availability there’ll be for exactly what you’re looking for.

As you get closer to the summer, options will dwindle and most importantly, our time will become limited as we start to focus on the upcoming season. From May to Sept, our small office staff is busy with daily operations and existing trips, and so booking during this time frame is less than ideal and considered “last-minute”. We are not able to offer Trip Package services for trips booked within 3 months of the start date, for example, and may be slower to respond during the summer months.

For Mountaineering Expeditions, we recommend booking between December and February so you have a solid plan and can have ample time to prepare your gear and train for the trip. Mountaineering expeditions should not be spontaneous, last-minute decisions as they are serious endeavors and we don’t want to jeopardize the success or safety of the team by adding a participant who has not trained or mentally prepared for the challenges ahead. For this reason, we don’t take last-minute reservations for our objective-based expeditions.

We want you to feel comfortable booking your adventures with us knowing that anything can happen between now and then. Check out our Multi-Day Trip Cancellation Policy.

What is a climbing resume and why do you need one from me?

Some of our mountaineering and ski expeditions, especially the objective-based trips, require participants to submit a climbing resume. A climbing resume lists out your relevant outdoor and climbing experience. We use these to get to know you a little better and to make sure you are signing up on a trip of an appropriate level for everyone’s safety and enjoyment.

This does not have to be a formal document with fancy letterhead, there is no particular format to follow and as long as the info is there, you can email this to us at any time. You can include mountaineering expeditions, rock climbs, ice climbs, alpine climbs, scrambles, and traverses – you can definitely include attempts that didn’t quite make it, but please make that clear in your notes and why. The important details to include about each outing are the name of the area or mountain, the route name, the difficulty rating, the month and year you did it, and your role on the team (was it a solo attempt, where you guided by a professional, were you guiding a group of friends?). You may choose to include other details about your climbs like the distance or elevation gained, how the climb felt to you (was it super easy or were you at your limit?), or anything remarkable that happened during the outing. It can also be helpful to know a little about your general fitness and outdoor experience so you can include information on your workout habits or other relevant athletic feats (extended backpacking trips you’ve been on or how many miles you run a week, for example).

We will review your resume and may have follow-up questions and from there we’ll be able to advise you as to which expedition is best for you!

Do you recommend travel and/or rescue insurance?

If you are considering getting travel insurance for your Alaska trip, then you may have heard of other types of insurance like rescue or med-evac insurance. We’re going to go over the different options and our recommendations:

Travel Insurance

Travel insurance covers trip cancellations, interruptions, changes, lost luggage, etc. For further details on coverage please refer to a specific travel insurance provider’s website. Most plans also include some amount of emergency medical coverage. 

  • We do recommend travel insurance for most of our guests, especially for multi-day trips, however, there isn’t a perfect policy that will work for everyone. This insurance generally extends beyond your time with St. Elias Alpine Guides and can cover your entire Alaskan vacation. 

Recommendations:

Rescue Insurance

Rescue insurance covers the initial rescue or evacuation from the backcountry and following medical expenses. Search is typically not included and instead is a separate policy. 

  • We don’t have a particular stance on this one*. With most rescue insurance policies you must initiate the rescue yourself through the insurance provider – in the event of an emergency on one of our trips, we follow our own protocols to initiate and organize a rescue/extraction using local resources first.
  • Check with your provider to see what would be covered in an event of an in-field emergency where we initiated a rescue. Some companies will still be able to help with many other aspects of your care post backcountry extraction like medical evacuation (below), transport to your preferred hospital in your home state, or other non-extraction emergencies like delivering you life-saving medication, etc.

Recommendations:

Medical Evacuation Insurance

Med-Evac Insurance covers the transportation costs should you need to be evacuated from the front country. This is useful for travelers who are heading to remote locations, going on a cruise, or traveling abroad. This differs from rescue insurance in that many policies will cover your expenses after the backcountry evacuation. 

  • We don’t have a particular stance on this one either*. Some folks like to be as covered as possible while others understand that the need to use something like Medical Evacuation insurance is going to be extremely unlikely, so they’ll go without. While many policies cover you outside of Alaska, our recommendation is specific to the state.

Recommendations:

 

 

*For our Mountaineering and other Backcountry Trips, we do recommend having either Med Evac or Rescue Insurance, but we do not require it.

 

Please refer to this article to gain a further understanding of trip insurance policies and providers. 

We do not provide travel or rescue insurance nor do we partner with any specific insurance companies. 

What is an “Alaskan Mile”?

If you’ve ever talked to us here at SEAG and asked “What is the mileage of the route?” chances are you’ve heard some hesitation and a vague answer. Why is that? The answer is simple, mileage here isn’t straight forward. The mileage for some of our longer 8-day backpacking trips is often around 25-30 miles. If you’re an avid backpacker, you’re likely thinking “that’s it?!” – yup, that’s it. BUT that’s 25-30 “Alaskan miles.” So what are Alaskan miles? These are miles that are not defined by a route, which mean on-site navigation over some pretty epic terrain that can include, step elevation gain and loss, side-hilling, glacial travel, creek crossings,  bush-whacking, and more! While the miles you hike in the backcountry of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park will be tough, they’ll also be some of the most rewarding hiking of your life.

What are Group Trip Minimums and how do they work?

In order to guarantee any* St. Elias Alpine Guides Group Trip goes at the listed Group Rate, a minimum of 3 participants must sign up. At 45 days prior to the starting date, we will let you know whether or not your trip has met the minimum number of participants to guarantee the Group Rates. If your trip has not met the minimum, you will have 2 full weeks to choose one of the following options:

  • You may pay a surcharge to guarantee the trip. This surcharge varies depending on the trip and how many participants are signed up. If others join and the Group minimum is met after you pay the surcharge, you will be refunded the surcharge.
  • You may switch to another itinerary during the same dates – subject to availability and trip price adjustment.
  • You may cancel your trip minus a $100 administration fee.
  • You may roll your entire balance into credit for a future trip with no penalty.

 

*Rafting trips have pricing set for Groups of different sizes. 30 days before the trip begins, we will let you know how many people have signed up for the trip and adjust your final pricing accordingly, at which time your balance will be due. If more participants sign up after you’ve paid your final balance, we will refund you the difference between the rate you paid and the newly adjusted Group Rate.

 

What tents do you use and should I bring my own?

On our Backpacking, Basecamp, Rafting or Mountaineering Trips a shared tent will be provided for you, however, if you have your own tent and can bring it, we recommend that you do. You’ll be most comfortable with the equipment you’re already familiar with (or you can become familiar with it on this trip) and this is probably why you got a tent in the first place – to use it!

For our Backpacking, Basecamp, and Rafting Trips we use lightweight 2-man and 3-man, 3-season tents with double vestibules. Our fleet of rental tents includes a variety of brands and models like MSR Elixers and Alps Mountaineering Extreme. Other great options are the Big Agnes Copper Spur or MSR Hubba Hubba.

For our Mountaineering and Ski Trips we use sturdy but lightweight double-wall, 4-season tents with vestibules like the Mountain Hardwear Trango.

If you’d like to bring your own tent, double-check the make and model with us first to make sure it’ll stand up to the rugged demands of the Alaskan backcountry!

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